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Portland, OR

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In The Press

Virtually everything you eat tastes better with salt.”
— Mark Bitterman, Wall Street Journal

AS FEATURED IN...

Mark has been recognized as a Local Food Hero by Cooking Light and a Tastemaker in Food & Wine. He has been featured in The New York Times, The Atlantic, O, GQ, Rachael Ray, Wine Spectator, Esquire, and on The Splendid Table, All Things Considered, Bizarre Foods, CBS News, ABC News, Fox News, MSNBC, CNN, the History Channel, and more.


THE Huffington Post

December 2016

Brian O'Rourke explores Mark Bitterman's newest book, Bitterman's Craft Salt Cooking. This Cookbook Review showcases the diversity and utility salt can bring to almost every dish. Adding in an original recipe and a lot of great insight Brian proclaims, "It’s not a Morton’s world anymore!".

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Cooking by the book

December 2016

Here is a mouth watering recipe for Colorado Beef Burgers with Mesquite-Smoked Salt and Chiles, inspired by Bitterman's Craft Salt Cookingfrom Brian O'Rourke. O'Rourke brings together a wonderful smokey blend of ingredients sure to please any burger fanatic and tops it with one of the delicious smoked salts from Bitterman's.

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live wire! radio

December 2015

Comic Kristina Wong fills Luke in on the virtues of live-streaming a first date, Mark Bitterman, author of Bitterman’s Field Guide to Bitters and Amari, explains what bitters can do for your cocktails, comic Sean Jordan offers up the sickest burn to his dad ever, and Esmé Patterson's lilting voice warms up your winter.

Listen to the podcast 


THE wall street journal

December 2015

Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan explores the age old question: Does Salt Deserve a Place at The Table? Author Mark Bitterman believes in experimenting with the essential table mineral: ‘Salt’s primary role is to accentuate flavor—it defines flavors more clearly and amplifies them.' 

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THE SPLENDID TABLE

November 2015

Lynne Rossetto Kasper looks at the bitters craze with Mark Bitterman, author of Bitterman’s Field Guide to Bitters and Amari. and offers up a few "bittered" recipes from the new book, like bittered popcorn and tangerine-fennel salad.

Listen to the podcast 


PORTLAND MONTHLY

October 2015

Mark Bitterman knows more about bitters than anyone on the planet. The tasting notes, rating scales, and recipes that Bitterman forged in the aftermath are enlightening, hallucinogenic, and always entertaining. They’re also the backbone to Bitterman’s Field Guide to Bitters and Amari, due out October 27. It’s the first book to telegraph this growing force in America’s cocktail culture and argue a place for bitters at the food table. (Fernet flan, this is your moment.)

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THE TIMES OF INDIA

September 2015

"I have been researching salts for three years, trying to pair different salts with different cuisines," says Rathod, sous chef at Radisson Blu Hotel GRT and probably the only self-styled selmelier in India. His inspiration is American food writer and entrepreneur Mark Bitterman, who coined the word 'selmelier'. According to him, the selmelier is to salt what the sommelier is to wine, "providing information and expertise that helps diners, chefs, and retailers get the best results from their food, restaurants, and stores."

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cbs miami

August 2015

There used to be a time when asking for a salt shaker meant the chef didn’t add enough flavor. Today, some cooks choose to leave the seasoning unfinished in the kitchen to allow you to put the final touch on yourself using artisan finishing salts... These premium options aren’t exclusively for self-proclaimed foodies like Melanie. Mark Bitterman has literally written a book on salt and owns a store which specializes in artisan options. “We sell about 120 different kinds of salt from all over the world and really there are thousands and thousands of different types,” said Bitterman.

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FOOD & WINE

April 2015

Salt, as any aspiring kitchen scientist can tell you, is a flavor enhancer. It’s not the star of a dish; it’s a supporting player—unless it’s really, really, really good salt. This past Tuesday, chef Michael Stanton of The Heathman Restaurant & Bar in Portland, Oregon, and selmelier Mark Bitterman ofThe Meadow (a specialty salt shop with locations in New York City and Portland) teamed up to create a dinner at the James Beard House in which weird and wonderful salts were the main event. There were salt block-cured sturgeon, salt-crusted morels and even a dessert of chocolate-covered pear dipped in three different salts.

Here, five unique salts Bitterman and Stanton think everyone should try.

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THE SMITHSONIAN

February 2015

Mark Bitterman joined The Smithsonian for a presentation about salt’s history and how it’s shaking things up in today’s culinary world, with tastings featuring six dazzling artisan-made salts and find out how to use one of nature’s most ancient ingredients to perform miracles in the modern kitchen. Bitterman is the award-winning author of Salted and Salt Block Cooking and owner of the specialty store, The Meadow.

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KATU 

December 2014

Mark Bitterman, the author of The Salt Block Cooking Cookbook, showed Dav how to make lush European-style drinking chocolate—with a uniquely and deliciously modern American twist. It’s surprisingly easy, and believe it or not, incredibly healthy. Chocolate, water, a pinch of spice and salt! 

Watch the video


casual living

December 2014

Mark Bitterman owner of The Meadow, a Portland, Ore.-based three-store gourmet boutique specializing in chocolates, bitters and salt blocks believes salt blocks are the essential food enhancing agent for grilled meats.

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The economist

November 2014

Homer called salt a “divine substance”, but nowadays it’s the culinary bogeyman. Countless studies and stats warn us about eating too much, or eating too little, but there’s no denying that in the right proportion it’s essential for our survival—and it makes food taste great.

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kinfolk

August 2014

Salt has been around forever, but you still might say that Mark Bitterman put it on the map. We interview him about food writing, food eating and a lifelong love affair with the sea, chocolate, salt and bitters.

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portland monthly

June 2014

Portland-based selmelier, writer, and specialty shop owner Mark Bitterman is launching a special month-long event at The Meadow's Northwest location that puts the spotlight on one of our favorite things - chocolate.

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katu

August 2013

It's a way to cook food that is both incredibly delicious and visually stunning. Mark Bitterman, co-owner of The Meadow and author of the new book, Salt Block Cooking, joined us to show off how the ancient mineral can make foods from ice cream to meats taste even better.

Watch the video


food republic

June 2013

"We've never been so excited to see a big pink slab of salt! First up, a barely-cured sashimi served on a natural salt brick."

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Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern

April 2013

Andrew Zimmern visits Portland and discovers The Meadow and our Sal de Gusano. Also known as gusano rojo or chinicuil, gusano is a larva that feeds on maguey and agave plants. It is great as an all-purpose seasoning salt for proteins like eggs and steak. Also try rimming a sundae cup with Sal de Gusano to serve tuna ceviche.

Watch the video


Portlandia and GQ at The Meadow

March 2013

Portlandia stars Fred Armisen and Carrie Brownstein taste some salt and chocolate with Mark Bitterman.

Watch the video


The Amateur Gourmet

December 2012

The first salt that I tried was perhaps the most shocking: Kala Namak from India. The flavor is immediately intense–reminiscent of Indian food or cumin–and I’ll admit, I thought it was some kind of spice blend when I first tried it. But reading about it online, I discovered that the aroma occurs naturally because of its sulfur content. Wikipedia likens it to “rotten eggs” which isn’t particularly appealing; I’d liken it more to how cumin smells a little bit like body odor? But in a good sort of way?

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Specialty Food Magazine

November 2012

“In a time of ingredient-driven cuisine, people are looking for quality ingredients that make their dishes pop. They are turning to artisan salts, rediscovering something authentic and real that has been overlooked for years,” says selmelier Mark Bitterman, author of Salted, A Manifesto on the World’s Most Essential Mineral and owner of The Meadow, a specialty shop of salts, chocolates, flowers and bitters with locations in Portland, Ore., and New York. “The resurgence of artisan salts is no longer subtle; it is becoming mind-blowing.”

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Food & Wine

August 2012

What is salt? Chemists would say it’s sodium chloride, but why does it come in so many shapes and sizes? Mark Bitterman’s salt obsession began in France more than 25 years ago, when he met Michelin-starred chefs who traveled with their own precious supply. Along with his wife, Jennifer, Bitterman now owns a store called The Meadow, with branches in Portland, OR, and New York City that sell salts from all over the world. Many are tracked down by Bitterman or custom-made, like his house fleur de sel.

In two other articles, Mark talks about How to Season with Salt and he names the six sins against salt.

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Baltimore Post-Examiner

June 2012

Visiting The Meadow was an unexpected and rather mind blowing treat. I hadn’t heard of the artisanal salt, bitters, chocolate, flower and vermouth store before — clearly due to a lack of reading on my part because after visiting I spent some time on the Internet researching this wondrous place and its well-earned reputation for amazing products. When I walked into this spot I was overwhelmed by the sheer number of salts and dark chocolates lining the walls — we’re talking hundreds of examples of each.

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The Kitchn

April 2012

We are often quick to complain long and loud about bad customer service experiences. But what about great experiences? Sometimes a company just goes above and beyond in service — whether that is seen in correcting a mistake, offering special education and resources to customers, or just being all-round nice people. What are your stories of amazing customer service from kitchen shops and brands? Other kitchen shops simply go above and beyond in education and resources for their customers. Mark Bitterman loves to teach customers about salt at his shop in Portland.

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The Recipe Club

May 2011

"I wrote Salted because I was frustrated—or maybe appalled is the better word. There was not a single book out there that seriously examined the different salts produced by different people around the world. Salt is the first ingredient, the most universal ingredient, the most powerful ingredient. For ten millennia salt has been made by virtually every society in every corner of the globe, where it reigned supreme over entire cultures. Every salt was a unique reflection of the world’s diverse peoples..."

Read more of Mark's interview here 


The Splendid Table

November 2010

Hosted by award-winning Lynne Rossetto Kasper, The Splendid Table is a culinary, culture and lifestyle program that celebrates food and its ability to touch the lives and feed the souls of everyone. This week we talk with Mark Bitterman author of Salted: A Manifesto on the World's Most Essential Mineral, with Recipes.

Listen here